Cartika Blog

IAAS, CLOUD, AND MANAGED SERVICES BLOG

Category : Cloud

iCloud Vulnerability Demonstrates Importance Of Rate Limiting For Cloud Security

There’s probably no one with access to the Internet who isn’t aware that the security of Apple’s iCloud platform was called into question recently. I’m not going discuss the appalling theft of private data that ensued, but I do want to look at a related issue: rate limiting. While we’re not entirely sure of the cause of the leak of celebrity’s private photos—the likely strategy was simple social engineering, research of publicly available information, and the exploitation of poor password choices—we do know that around the same time a vulnerability was discovered in iCloud that made life much easier for any potential hackers.

Why Are Distributed Denial Of Service Attacks So Hard To Defend Against?

DDoS attacks have been hitting the headlines with increasing frequency over the last few months. They’re a favored strategy of “hacktivists”, extortionists, and online criminals hoping to create a distraction. In principle, DDoS attacks are quite simple. At the most basic level, a collective of compromised Internet-connected machines direct a flood of data at the target with the aim of degrading its performance, either by saturating its connection to the Internet or using up its resources. The result is a site or service that is no longer usable by visitors. If you’re a Feedly user, you’ll have experienced the results of a DDoS attack recently. Attackers flooded the RSS feed reader’s servers with data, in effect knocking it out of service for several days with the intention of extracting a payment from the company — a sort of modern protection racket.

Online Security Basics: DNS Amplification Attacks Explained

DNS amplification attacks are one of the most pernicious vulnerabilities in the Internet’s infrastructure and a favored tool of online criminals with an axe to grind or a need to create a distraction. They’re also a useful example of how infrastructure that grows organically over many years can cause problems because of features created in a different time. Even more striking is the fact that if companies and others running DNS servers put their mind to it, DNS amplification attacks could be rendered impossible.

6 Open Source Projects Web Developers Need To Know About

GitHub is a developer’s dream: not just for managing their own code, but for discovering new and exciting scripts, frameworks, and tools to use in their work. Among the tens of thousands of projects, it can be difficult to sort the wheat from the chaff. GitHub’s popularity means that there are plenty of awesome projects, but they can be hard to find amid the dross. In this article, I’d like to highlight six open source projects that have recently caught my interest. The functionality they provide varies, but each deserves consideration for a prominent place in a web developer’s toolbox.

HTTP 2.0 Nears The End Of Its Development Phase

Later this month, the HTTPbis working group will make their last call for input into HTTP 2.0, the first major revision in a decade and a half to the protocol on which the web runs. This November, assuming all goes according to schedule, HTTP 2.0 will be submitted to the Internet Engineering Steering Group for consideration as a proposed standard, after which it’ll travel through the process for adoption as a standard. The aim of HTTP 2.0 is to make the web’s technology more suitable to the way that modern web services and sites work, with particular focus on reducing latency and improving performance. In the late 90s, when the current version of HTTP was developed, the web was a very different place. Most sites were static and served from one server. Today’s websites are dynamic, interactive, and made up of components that reside on many different servers.

Why Choosing PCI-Compliant Hosting Matters

They say money makes the world go round, and that’s certainly true of the world wide web. In spite of its early and idealistic origins as a platform for unhindered communication, the Internet has grown to its current size and influence because of its commercial potential. eCommerce is one of the strongest drivers of that growth, and eCommerce would be impossible without a secure and trusted way to transfer money between customers and vendors. The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard is the de facto standard to which responsible hosting companies who deal with credit card data adhere. The PCI-DSS lays out a set of best practices that help guarantee that when customers send credit card data across the Internet, it will be treated with the respect and level of security necessary to deserve their trust.

Enterprises Don’t Have To Choose Between The Public And Private Cloud

Much of the thinking around data storage and processing construes enterprise data as an undifferentiated mass. The reality is very different. Data is differentiated across multiple axes: from low to high value, from business critical to potentially useful, from highly sensitive to publishable, and from time sensitive to archival, among many other potential lines of variation. No one-size-fits-all solution can be sufficient to accommodate the matrix of potential species of data and their meaning to a particular enterprise.