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HTTP 2.0 Nears The End Of Its Development Phase

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HTTP2.0 End Of Development CycleLater this month, the HTTPbis working group will make their last call for input into HTTP 2.0, the first major revision in a decade and a half to the protocol on which the web runs. This November, assuming all goes according to schedule, HTTP 2.0 will be submitted to the Internet Engineering Steering Group for consideration as a proposed standard, after which it’ll travel through the process for adoption as a standard. The aim of HTTP 2.0 is to make the web’s technology more suitable to the way that modern web services and sites work, with particular focus on reducing latency and improving performance. In the late 90s, when the current version of HTTP was developed, the web was a very different place. Most sites were static and served from one server. Today’s websites are dynamic, interactive, and made up of components that reside on many different servers.

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Why Choosing PCI-Compliant Hosting Matters

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PCI Compliant HostingThey say money makes the world go round, and that’s certainly true of the world wide web. In spite of its early and idealistic origins as a platform for unhindered communication, the Internet has grown to its current size and influence because of its commercial potential. eCommerce is one of the strongest drivers of that growth, and eCommerce would be impossible without a secure and trusted way to transfer money between customers and vendors.

The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard is the de facto standard to which responsible hosting companies who deal with credit card data adhere. The PCI-DSS lays out a set of best practices that help guarantee that when customers send credit card data across the Internet, it will be treated with the respect and level of security necessary to deserve their trust.

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Enterprises Don’t Have To Choose Between The Public And Private Cloud

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Public & Private CloudMuch of the thinking around data storage and processing construes enterprise data as an undifferentiated mass. The reality is very different. Data is differentiated across multiple axes: from low to high value, from business critical to potentially useful, from highly sensitive to publishable, and from time sensitive to archival, among many other potential lines of variation. No one-size-fits-all solution can be sufficient to accommodate the matrix of potential species of data and their meaning to a particular enterprise.

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